Take a Leap of Faith

This is the time of year, second only to May, for gardening the garden and especially for planting. With the flowering season in easy recall, right now is the time to review, to plan, to make notes, and to plant more plants. Be careful though with dividing or transplanting, while most perennials planted this time of year will do well, only a handful should be disturbed in the fall.

Many early spring flowering perennials are best planted now.

Many early spring flowering perennials are best planted now.

Your perennials are better planted when not in flower, giving them a chance to get their roots into the soil before expending energy blooming. A healthy potted plant with vigorous foliage will establish more easily than one in full flower. Our tendency is to be seduced by the flowers of plants whenever we are shopping for them and to then find in our gardens only what was in bloom those few times—often May, June, and perhaps once in July. I find when taking inventory of my clients' gardens, missing mostly are early spring flowering plants, April to May, and late summer into fall flowering plants, August to October.

Because Epimediums bloom so early in the spring they need to be divided in the fall.

Because Epimediums bloom so early in the spring they need to be divided in the fall.

Planting perennials that are not in bloom is an exercise in hope and trust. It’s not unlike planting bulbs in the fall and then waiting, wondering, hoping they will emerge from the ground and be all you wished for. Young plants planted now will reward you with larger clumps and more flowers when they bloom next year. Gardeners have to be optimists at heart. Take a leap of faith!

See you in the garden, 

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